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MEPs vote to reduce pollutant emissions from buildings

On 11 October, the European Parliament’s Industry Committee adopted its position on the Energy Performance of Buildings Directive (EPBD). The EPBD is the legal basis of energy performance certificates, which are used to assess and display energy consumption of houses, flats or offices in labels ranking them in A to G classes. Among other provisions,the EPBD also requires Member States to set targets to renovate their building blocks, in order to increase their efficiency.


As explained in earlier AEGPL communications, the proposal to revise this Directive was part of the Clean Energy package released by the European Commission last November. The reason why the Directive is being revised is that the European Commission found important shortcomings in its implementation. In particular, it considered the pace of the renovation of buildings unsatisfactory.

Over the past year, AEGPL has advocated for ensuring that the new measures also look at the possible benefits of actions aiming not only at improving the efficiency of the building stock, but also at reducing its pollutant emissions. If this approach were taken, Member States would need to promote heating appliances that not only are energy efficient, but that also produce low levels of emissions, such as LPG heating appliances.

Importantly, with today’s vote, the Industry Committee of the European Parliament is introducing a new obligation on Member States to evaluate the benefits of their renovation plans in terms of public health and of air quality. The European Union recently set a target to reduce particulate matter emissions by 49% by 2030, the majority of which are produced by the buildings sector. If it is demonstrated that the renovation plans that Member States will draft may not bring the building stock significantly close to the air quality standards set in EU legislation, then national stakeholders could possibly challenge the proposed measures and ensure that clean fuels are promoted over more polluting ones.

The text will soon be voted by the European Parliament in plenary session and then interinstitutional negotiations will start with the EU Council. The Parliament and the Council are expected to reach an agreement on the proposal by the end of December
.

the European Parliament’s Industry Committee adopted its position on the Energy Performance of Buildings Directive (EPBD). The EPBD is the legal basis of energy performance certificates, which are used to assess and display energy consumption of houses, flats or offices in labels ranking them in A to G classes. Among other provisions,the EPBD also requires Member States to set targets to renovate their building blocks, in order to increase their efficiency.


As explained in earlier AEGPL communications, the proposal to revise this Directive was part of the Clean Energy package released by the European Commission last November. The reason why the Directive is being revised is that the European Commission found important shortcomings in its implementation. In particular, it considered the pace of the renovation of buildings unsatisfactory.

Over the past year, AEGPL has advocated for ensuring that the new measures also look at the possible benefits of actions aiming not only at improving the efficiency of the building stock, but also at reducing its pollutant emissions. If this approach were taken, Member States would need to promote heating appliances that not only are energy efficient, but that also produce low levels of emissions, such as LPG heating appliances.

Importantly, with today’s vote, the Industry Committee of the European Parliament is introducing a new obligation on Member States to evaluate the benefits of their renovation plans in terms of public health and of air quality. The European Union recently set a target to reduce particulate matter emissions by 49% by 2030, the majority of which are produced by the buildings sector. If it is demonstrated that the renovation plans that Member States will draft may not bring the building stock significantly close to the air quality standards set in EU legislation, then national stakeholders could possibly challenge the proposed measures and ensure that clean fuels are promoted over more polluting ones.

The text will soon be voted by the European Parliament in plenary session and then interinstitutional negotiations will start with the EU Council. The Parliament and the Council are expected to reach an agreement on the proposal by the end of December
.

 
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